Posts By: twebb

The first AI-generated textbook has been published – but is it useful?

Academic publisher Springer Nature has unveiled what it claims is the first research book generated using machine learning. Lithium-Ion Batteries: A Machine-Generated Summary of Current Research is a summary of peer-reviewed papers includes quotations, hyperlinks to the work cited, and automatically generated references contents. Does this herald a new era in scientific publishing? Read the full… Read more » about The first AI-generated textbook has been published – but is it useful?

Can AI be a fair judge in court?

Estonia has been adopting AI (Artificial intelligence) for many applications; algorithms assessing satellite images and determining when fields need cutting, matching the skills of unemployed workers with employers and, in their latest ambitious project, an AI judge to adjudicate small claims disputes. This may be the first attempt to give an algorithm decision-making authority in… Read more » about Can AI be a fair judge in court?

Digital 2019 – global report on digital trends

Hootsuite’s report looks at the past 12 months in all things digital looking at how people around the world use the internet, mobile devices, social media and e-commerce. In 2018 there were more than one million new internet users each day with 57% of the world’s population now connected to the internet. Social media accounts… Read more » about Digital 2019 – global report on digital trends

The biggest impact of artificial intelligence? helping humans make discoveries we couldn’t make on our own

Research productivity—the number of researchers it takes to produce a given result—is declining annually. Could AI make research faster and more productive, reviving areas that have become too expensive for businesses to pursue? This MIT Technology Review article looks at the way AI is reinventing the way we invent, the predictions for machine learning and… Read more » about The biggest impact of artificial intelligence? helping humans make discoveries we couldn’t make on our own

Video feedback using Brightspace and Panopto

In this short 7 minute video, Suzy Atfield-Cutts in Computing demonstrates how to create Panopto video feedback with Brightspace submissions.  Recording with Panopto has the benefit of a longer time duration than using standard Brightspace video feedback and the main screen can also be captured allowing students to follow through the comments with their piece… Read more » about Video feedback using Brightspace and Panopto

How the smartphone is being developed into a medical grade diagnostic tool

Huge computational power, a high-resolution screen, excellent cameras, and connected and available worldwide – all these capabilities are the reason companies and researchers worldwide are exploring the potential of smartphones for medical diagnosis. Apps that have already been developed and are in use include urine test kits and simple eye tests for developing countries. The… Read more » about How the smartphone is being developed into a medical grade diagnostic tool

BETT 2019 Day Three

Bett is the industry show for education technology, bringing together 850+ companies, 100+ edtech start-ups and more than 34,000 attendees. Hosted at the Excel in London, Stephen Pyne and Tracey Webb took the opportunity to visit on 25 January. Tablet Academy  – Escape room   Fighting the queues, we managed to secure ourselves a slot in… Read more » about BETT 2019 Day Three

How do universities prepare graduates for jobs that don’t even exist?

65% of children entering primary schools today will work in jobs and functions that don’t currently exist.  In the midst of the fourth industrial revolution, how do we know what the future will look like? The ‘Solving future skills challenges’ report from Universities UK predicts a talent deficit, not just in technological skills but also… Read more » about How do universities prepare graduates for jobs that don’t even exist?

Wearable medical tech developments in 2019

Wearable tech or ‘Wearables’ are already replacing traditional drugs and therapies and in 2019 it is predicted their impact will go further still, from helping patients with Parkinsons with their motor movements to specialist glasses for children with ADD/ADHD. See the full article by Pattie Maes, Professor of Media Technology at MIT Media Lab here