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Dr Duncan Light interviewed about Dracula tourism on Radio New Zealand

Dr Duncan Light interviewed about Dracula tourism on Radio New Zealand

For over 10 years Duncan Light has been studying the development of ‘Dracula tourism’ in Romania. He was recently interviewed about this subject on the “Nights” show on Radio New Zealand.

You can hear the full interview here: http://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player?audio_id=201843391

 

You can hear the full interview here: http://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player?audio_id=201843391

Professional Development Courses for the Tourism and Hospitality Sector start at Bournemouth University

Professional Development Courses for the Tourism and Hospitality Sector have started at Bournemouth University

Professional Development Courses for the Tourism and Hospitality Sector at Bournemouth University May 9 – 18

Professional Development Courses for the Tourism and Hospitality Sector at Bournemouth University May 9 – 18

https://www1.bournemouth.ac.uk/events/professional-development-courses-tourism-hospitality-sector

Bookings:  https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/bournemouthuniversity 

Light, D. (2017) Progress in dark tourism and thanatourism research: An uneasy relationship with heritage tourism, Tourism Management, 61, 275-301

Light, D. (2017) Progress in dark tourism and thanatourism research: An uneasy relationship with heritage tourism, Tourism Management, 61, 275-301

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261517717300092

This paper reviews academic research into dark tourism and thanatourism over the 1996e2016 period.
The aims of this paper are threefold. First, it reviews the evolution of the concepts of dark tourism and
thanatourism, highlighting similarities and differences between them. Second it evaluates progress in 6
key themes and debates. These are: issues of the definition and scope of the concepts; ethical issues
associated with such forms of tourism; the political and ideological dimensions of dark tourism and
thanatourism; the nature of demand for places of death and suffering; the management of such places;
and the methods of research used for investigating such tourism. Third, research gaps and issues that
demand fuller scrutiny are identified. The paper argues that two decades of research have not
convincingly demonstrated that dark tourism and thanatourism are distinct forms of tourism, and in
many ways they appear to be little different from heritage tourism.

new article Philip Long The parallel worlds of tourism destination management and the creative industries: exchanging knowledge, theory and practice

The parallel worlds of tourism destination management and the creative industries: exchanging knowledge, theory and practice

, 2017  The parallel worlds of tourism destination management and the creative industries: exchanging knowledge, theory and practice, Journal Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events, Pages 1-10 | Published online: 04 Apr 2017

Meeting the HE Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul Minister of Tourism for Thailand

Meeting the HE Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul Minister of Tourism for Thailand again was an incredibly emotional experience for Professor Buhalis Head of Department for Tourism and Hospitality Bournemouth University. Not only she is one of the most dynamic Tourism Ministers in the world I have ever met but she is incredibly effective and humble at the same time. 

At the recent WTTC Summit she made sure that each single delegate, from Ministers from around the world to each delegate received a royal welcome to the land of smiles Thailand. All efforts resulted to the best WTTC Summit I have ever attended and the outgoing President and CEO David Scowsill and Chairman of the World Travel & Tourism Council Gerald Lawless thanked her profoundly for all her support. 

She delivered such an emotional farewell speech that she made every single person in the room a passionate supporter for Thailand and its Tourism. Meeting the HE Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul Minister of Tourism for Thailand is an incredible leader and the best tourism global ambassador that any country can wish for. 

Thank you minister for your vision and commitment and your leadership. As I explained the Department of Tourism and Hospitality Bournemouth University will support tourism in Thailand through a whole range of activities and knowledge cocreation for the benefit of all stakeholders.

— at Centara Grand and Bangkok Convention Centre.

 
HE Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul Minister of Tourism for Thailand with Professor Dimitrios Buhalis Bournemouth University

HE Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul Minister of Tourism for Thailand with Professor Dimitrios Buhalis Bournemouth University

New research Eric Tchouamou Njoya and Neelu Seetaram 2017, Tourism Contribution to Poverty Alleviation in Kenya: A Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Analysis,

Eric Tchouamou Njoya and Neelu Seetaram 2017,  Tourism Contribution to Poverty Alleviation in Kenya: A Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Analysis, 

Journal of Travel Research, 1–12  doi.org/10.1177/0047287517700317

Abstract

The aim of this article is to investigate the claim that tourism development can be the engine for poverty reduction in Kenya using a dynamic, microsimulation computable general equilibrium model. The article improves on the common practice in the literature by using the more comprehensive Foster-Greer-Thorbecke (FGT) index to measure poverty instead of headcount ratios only. Simulations results from previous studies confirm that expansion of the tourism industry will benefit different sectors unevenly and will only marginally improve poverty headcount. This is mainly due to the contraction of the agricultural sector caused the appreciation of the real exchange rates. This article demonstrates that the effect on poverty gap and poverty severity is, nevertheless, significant for both rural and urban areas with higher impact in the urban areas. Tourism expansion enables poorer households to move closer to the poverty line. It is concluded that the tourism industry is pro-poor.

Keywords

Kenya, tourism development, poverty, dynamic computable general equilibrium, CGE, microsimulation, Foster-Greer-Thorbecke Index

Building resilience in Research and Knowledge Exchange

Workshop: Building resilience in Research and Knowledge Exchange 27/4/17

Professor Heather Hartwell will be delivering a workshop on April 27th 2017 that will help participants gain insight into how it is possible to build resilience in the area of Research and Knowledge Exchange.

This session will explore how it may be possible to build resilience in the area of research and knowledge exchange, where rejection for funding and from publishers is common. The speaker will offer their views of how resilience can be built and how to overcome obstacles. There will be the opportunity for discussion around the topic.

For those interested in booking onto the course, please follow the link here.

If you would like further information about the workshop, please contact Ehren Milner (emilner@bournemouth.ac.uk)

What hospital catering could learn from the prison system – BU published in the Conversation

What hospital catering could learn from the prison system – BU published in the Conversation

Jeff Bray, Bournemouth University and Heather Hartwell, Bournemouth University

Prisoners eat better than hospital patients in Britain. Our research found that prisoners consume around three times more calories than patients and their diet is more in line with government nutritional recommendations. The Conversation

Eating more isn’t always healthier, but when you consider that malnutrition is a big problem in hospitals, it can be. We found that the average male hospital patient consumes just 1,184 calories a day – even though the NHS recommends 2,500. Male prisoners, however, consume an average of 3,042 calories. The situation is similar for women. Female patients consume on average 1,134 calories (the recommended amount is 1,940). But female prisoners consume 3,007 calories, on average.

The patients’ food intake was measured three days before they were discharged from hospital, so we can be fairly sure that they weren’t consuming less due to ill health. And they weren’t consuming less because they were served fewer calories. All menus could provide for dietary recommendations, but it simply wasn’t eaten.

Malnourished patients have a weakened immune system, delayed wound healing and muscle wasting. There are also psychological effects from malnutrition including apathy and depression leading to loss of morale and the will to recover. Studies have also shown that inadequate nutrition can lengthen patients’ hospital stays by 50% (an average of six days) and triple mortality rates.

Hospitals face a number of difficulties in providing high-quality food. Dishes are prepared on a tight budget. They are cooked at a central hospital kitchen and often have to travel a considerable distance to the wards. But prison food is also prepared on a tight budget and often has to travel considerable distances from the kitchen to the prison wing.

Four years of data gathering

During our four-year study, we visited four prisons for men and two for women. In each, we carefully noted how food was prepared, delivered to the prison wing and served to the prisoners. We analysed the menu and interviewed prisoners and catering staff. We conducted four hospital studies with a similar method of data collection, which helped us to assess and compare the dietary intakes of hospital patients and prisoners. Through this we were able to identify the main differences in catering.

In hospitals, kitchen staff prepare the meals and hand them to porters who complete the delivery when they have time, between doing other tasks. Once the food reaches the ward, the responsibility for serving the food is handed to nurses. The various teams have to cooperate to ensure that food is delivered while it’s still fresh. However, providing food is not the main priority of a hospital. We noted tension between catering staff, who cared about food quality, and medical staff, who didn’t consider it a priority.

At least you’ll be well fed.
Adrian Reynolds/Shutterstock.com

We found that the food prepared by hospital and prison kitchens – although not fine dining – has a similar nutritional quality and is presented in a similar manner. (Typical fare might include meat and two veg, a pudding or yogurt, and a piece of fruit.) In prison, food was transported quickly and food quality was maintained up to the point of service to the prisoners. The food arrived hot, comparatively fresh and could be consumed immediately without distractions. By contrast, hospital food was delayed between kitchen and patient.

A fragmented process

In the hospitals that we studied, getting food from the kitchen to the patient was a fragmented and badly coordinated process. Meals were often delayed and disrupted by medical ward rounds, tests and treatments.

The result of these delays? Food was left for too long in warming trolleys prior to being served. Hot food cools down and cold food warms up to the temperature of the ward. Food dries out and discolours. Meat curls and gravy congeals. Compared with prisons, the temperature, texture and appearance of food were all worse in hospitals by the time the food was served. Nutrients may also have diminished and the food became less palatable. Differences that are likely to account, at least in part, for the marked difference in intake between prisoners and patients.

But this is not inevitable. Delays could be reduced. Hospitals could adopt a more coordinated approach and have a dedicated team responsible for the preparation, delivery to the ward and service to the patient. The team responsible for catering would not have the conflicting priorities that clinical teams have. Although a few hospitals do have a dedicated catering team that delivers food directly to the patient, this is the exception, not the rule.

In many hospitals, nutrition is often an afterthought. Priority is given to medical tests and treatments and often ignores the role that food plays in improving the patient’s health. One governor told us that if meals were delayed or missed in prison there would be a riot.

Jeff Bray, Principal Academic Consumer Behaviour, Bournemouth University and Heather Hartwell, Professor, Bournemouth University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

– See more at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2017/04/09/what-hospital-catering-could-learn-from-the-prison-system-bu-published-in-the-conversation/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily#sthash.QKugEDf5.dpuf