Buhalis, D., Parra López, E.,  Martinez-Gonzalez, J.A., 2020, Influence of young consumers’ external and internal variables on their eloyalty to tourism sites, Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, Vol. 15,

New paper published:

Buhalis, D., Parra López, E.,  Martinez-Gonzalez, J.A., 2020, Influence of young consumers’ external and internal variables on their eloyalty to tourism sites, Journal of Destination Marketing & Management, Vol. 15, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdmm.2020.100409 Download FREE before April 11, 2020 https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1acJm_,51~BCpGT

 

Highlights

  • Demonstrates the high use of electronic commerce by young people.
  • Discovers the great potential of online influence of young people.
  • Verifies the greater causal influence of internal variables on e-loyalty.
  • Shows the positive influence of online purchase intention on e-loyalty.
  • Presents a practical causal model of purchase intent and e-loyalty.

Abstract

This study analyzes, in a generational context, the influence of young consumers’ external and internal variables on their e-loyalty to tourism sites. Using a large sample and employing structural equations (PLS), a new model is generated that includes two external variables (site design and eWOM) and two internal variables (trust and satisfaction), to which the intention to purchase online is added. These variables are very important in e-commerce and tourism, and they have not previously been studied jointly. The results show that the impact of consumers’ internal variables is greater than the impact from external ones. Moreover, the proposed causal model is practical and can be easily applied by tourism companies to improve site e-loyalty in the context of market orientation. The Importance-Performance Analysis (IPMA) carried out shows the importance of satisfaction over other variables.

Research & Knowledge Exchange Development Framework – give us your feedback

The Research & Knowledge Exchange Framework (RKEDF) is now into its fourth year.  It offers training and development opportunities to academics at all stages of their career, supporting staff to increase their skills, knowledge and capabilities.

The RKEDF offers a range of support including sessions for those who are new to research or to BU, for staff who want to further develop their research careers and for people who want to disseminate their research findings or create an impact plan.

The Research Development & Support team are currently planning activities and sessions for the 2020/21 programme of events and would like to hear your ideas and suggestions.  What’s worked well?  What would you changed?  Are there any other sessions or training materials you’d like to see included?  We’d like to hear both from people who have engaged with the RKEDF and those who haven’t.

Tell us what you think via our survey and be in with a chance of winning one of three £20 Amazon vouchers.  The deadline date is Sunday 15 March.

NEW ARTICLE PUBLISHEDStamolampros, P., Korfiatis; N., Chalvatzis, K., Buhalis, D., 2020, Harnessing the “Wisdom of Employees” from Online Reviews, Annals of Tourism Research,

NEW ARTICLE PUBLISHED

Stamolampros, P., Korfiatis; N., Chalvatzis, K., Buhalis, D., 2020, Harnessing the “Wisdom of Employees” from Online Reviews, Annals of Tourism Research, Vol.80, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2019.02.012
Download FREE Now https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1aSE6aZ3ER7Ql

The informational value of online employee reviews in tourism and hospitality research and practice. Online reviews can complement existing approaches offering access in a pool of opinion highly representative of the industry. The results of our analysis reveal that the unstructured form of reviews through topic analysis can efficiently capture important topics for employees and is in agreement with previous literature. As such it opens new avenues for researchers and practitioners since the intangible and heterogeneous nature of tourism and hospitality services can be measured with more direct data sources available to the decision makers, than cross-sectional questionnaires.

 

An interesting insight for managers in these industries is that the adaptation of management practices and improvement initiatives needs to be adjusted vertically (across business units) rather than horizontally (across the organization). The results of the analysis also provide an argument against the “one size fits all” approach (Hom, Lee, Shaw, & Hausknecht, 2017) in the management of service employees across tourism and hospitality industries and as such the incorporation of insights from satisfaction surveys in managerial practices need to be adjusted accordingly.

BRIAN will be unavailable due to upgrade – 28th & 29th January 2020

BRIAN will be unavailable to users next week on Tuesday 28th January and Wednesday 29th January for a scheduled upgrade.

If you need any help using the new system or if you encounter any problems after the upgrade, please do send an email to BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk and a member of staff will be able to assist you.

Staff are reminded that the REF Mock Exercise 2020 author outputs nomination on BRIAN will take place between 24 Feb and 8th March. For more information and guidance, please get in touch with ref@bournemouth.ac.uk.

In the meantime, if you do have general queries relating to the upgrade, please get in touch with BRIAN@bournemouth.ac.uk

Further information will be available once BRIAN is up and running again following the scheduled upgrade.

Contribute to two books : Smart Cities and Sharing Economy CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTERS

Contribute to two books : Smart Cities and Sharing Economy CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTERS

Published by Goodfellow Publishers
Smart Cities: Co-creating experiences, challenges and opportunities |
Editors: Dimitrios Buhalis, Babak Taheri, and Roya Rahimi https://easychair.org/cfp/SC1

The Sharing Economy: Perspectives, Opportunities and Challenges
Editors: Babak Taheri, Roya Rahimi, and Dimitrios Buhalis https://easychair.org/cfp/SE1

Important dates:
Abstract Deadline: 15th Jan 2020
Chapter Submission Deadline: 12 June 2020
Feedback deadlines: 8 August 2020
Submitting revised chapters: 30 October 2020
Review by editors: October to December 2020
Submitting final chapters: 18 December 2020
Submitting to Publisher: 12 February 2021

Action required – Guidelines for proposal submissions:

  • A 500-1,000 word proposal
  • Title page: title of the paper, full name of the author(s), affiliation and contact information
  • One diagram describing your contribution to the topic.
  • A short bio (around 150-250 words) for each author
  • Soft copy as Word document attachment should be uploaded to the links

_____________________________________________________________________Smart Cities: Co-creating experiences, challenges and opportunities
Editors: Dimitrios Buhalis, Babak Taheri, and Roya Rahimi
https://easychair.org/cfp/SC1

This book will provide a new insight for the current issues and opportunities on smart cities and related concepts in the next generation of urban evolution. It will provide a better understanding of city services but also the enhancement and evaluation of locals’ (and visitors) experience and city decision making processes by creating liveable environments and business solutions. The book will serve as a main reference point for smart cities researchers, scholars, students and practitioners state-of-art knowledge depository on marketing management (and related areas e.g., urban studies) from a new modern perspective within the smart cities.

PROVISIONAL AND INDICATIVE LIST OF CHAPTERS (SUGGESTIONS WELCOME!)
Ch 1. Introduction to Smart Cities: Co-creating experiences, challenges and opportunities
Ch 2. Co-creating smart experiences (defining co-creation of value and related concepts in contemporary age)
Ch 3. Current challenges for smart cities, tourism and urbanisation (challenges in cities which leads to need to smart cities opportunities)
Ch 4. Value co-creation in smart cities (defining smart cities and related concepts)
Ch 5. Digital transformation (in relation to smart cities and digital world)
Ch 6. Smart sustainable environment and cities (CSR and sustainability)
Ch 7. Smart people (Human capital: issues and opportunities in smart cities)
Ch 8. Smart economy (Investment: issues and opportunities in smart cities)
Ch 9. Smart mobility (Transportation: issues and opportunities in smart cities)
Ch 10. Smart living (Community engagement: issues and opportunities in smart cities)
Ch 11. Smart governance (Politics and government engagement)
Ch 12. Smart Business models, co-creation of experiences and smart cities
Ch 13. Smart trends in the tourism and hospitality industry
Ch 14. The Smart future: stakeholders, catalysts, opportunities and challenges
Ch 15. Case studies (this chapter will have a case study for each of 14 chapters)

_____________________________________________________________________The Sharing Economy: Perspectives, Opportunities and Challenges
Editors: Prof. Babak Taheri, Dr. Roya Rahimi, and Prof. Dimitrios Buhalis
https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=se1

This book will focus on the sharing economy from a marketing and managerial perspective and will explore implications area of tourism marketing and management, services marketing and urban studies. It will encourage new theoretical and empirical development on sharing economy studies in the service industries field and offers a new insight to indicate potential research opportunities and areas of interest different aspects of sharing economy. Target readership will be higher level undergraduate (UG) and postgraduate (PG).

PROVISIONAL AND INDICATIVE LIST OF CHAPTERS (SUGGESTIONS WELCOME!)
Ch 1. Introduction The Sharing Economy: Perspectives, Opportunities and Challenges
Ch 2. Exploration of service platforms and marketplaces (defining platform services, adventuristic start-ups)
Ch 3. Sharing economy (defining sharing economy and related concepts)
Ch 4. Application of co-creation of value: Two-sided markets (locals vs. visitors)
Ch 5. Gig economies (defining gig economy and related concepts)
Ch 6. National culture and sharing economy (matchmaking, and studies within other culture/context)
Ch 7. Overarching theories on sharing economy (e.g., social exchange theory, complexity theory, norm activation model, etc)
Ch 8. Models of platform-based sharing economy businesses (defining customer lifetime value (e.g., business to customer model; P2P: peer to peer model, etc.); plus for-fee models (e.g., Uber, Airbnb) or no-fee models (e.g., TripAdvisor, Instagram, Wikipedia)
Ch 9. Big data and digital marketing (the importance of digital marketing within the sharing economy)
Ch 10. Operations management in sharing economy (operations and process in sharing economy)
Ch 11. The law of sharing economy (regulations, licensing, roles of state governments etc)
Ch 12. Ethics and sustainability in sharing economy (CSR and sustainability issues)
Ch 13. Future of sharing economy
Ch 14. Case studies (this chapter will have a case study for each of 13 chapters)

Interview by BU Graduate Ioakeim Gritsipis, Founder of Just Grow Hospitality

BU Graduate Ioakeim Gritsipis, Founder of Just Grow Hospitality

We reproduce the interview of BU Graduate Ioakeim Gritsipis. Ioakeim graduated from Bournemouth University MSc in Tourism Management and Marketing in 2010.

Source https://news.gtp.gr/2019/12/02/new-faces-ioakeim-gritsipis-founder-just-grow-hospitality/?fbclid=IwAR14TSisGzDYne2pOrJAoBlsluX5yEy3zwZwJXRVdTVU7dV4F9J9hbuEz-g

Posted On 02 Dec 2019

“New Faces” is a column by GTP that introduces the young professionals of the Greek tourism industry. In each column, the young Greek professionals refer to issues related to their profession, the travel & tourism sector and Greece as a destination.

Ioakeim Gritsipis

“Greece needs to invest more in the combination: knowledge, people and technology. The industry needs to trust more the right talented professionals that have the right knowledge.

Business: Just Grow Hospitality
Location:  Athens, Greece

Ioakeim Gritsipis was born in Piraeus in 1983. He is a graduate of the Higher Technological Institute of Patras with a major in Tourism Management and a holder of a Master’s Degree in Tourism Management and Marketing from Bournemouth University, UK. Professionally, he has been in the hospitality and travel business since 2003. Having several years of working experience in hotels on Mykonos and in Athens, and after his Master’s degree, he joined Booking.com as an account manager. For seven years he was responsible for the sales and development of several destinations, some of them being among the top performing in Greece such as Santorini, Paros and islands in the Sporades group. Today, Ioakeim is the founder of Just Grow Hospitality, a hospitality sales and marketing management company that focuses on small and mid-sized accommodations with a current portfolio of more than 10 properties.

  • What are the things you like best about your job and how would you describe your hospitality and tourism management philosophy?

What I love most about my job is that it deals with the dynamic nature of the tourism industry. Every day is a new day with new challenges and that fascinates me. Additionally, my job is always balanced between two aspects – the human factor and the business factor. On one hand, and above all, everything has to do with the people and their experiences, whereas on the other hand, we have the technology and the data that steer our strategic decisions. Both of them are very important and I really enjoying the dual nature of my job.

  • Have you had to face any challenges in your career to get to where you are today?

The great part of this job is that we face challenges every day. Sometimes small, sometimes big. But all of the challenges are opportunities to evolve, to learn, to become better and therefore Grow.

  • In regards to hospitality, where do you think Greece needs to improve the most?

In Greece, generally, hospitality is part of our culture and we have a good base. There is, however, plenty of room for improvement in several fields of the business. More specifically, I focus more in my field and on small and mid-sized properties since we have a very large amount of them. In my experience, such properties need to improve and organize more their sales and marketing efforts and tactics. Also, I emphasize the need of these properties to enhance their procedures to monitor and audit their performance and their revenues, something which will help them steer their business more efficiently. Technology plays a crucial role in this, as nowadays we have plenty of tools and helpful data that properties have yet to take full advantage of.

  • What would you say is Greece’s best kept “secret”? (In other words, what shouldn’t be a secret in your opinion and should be promoted more abroad?)

The best kept “secret” is that in Greece we have a very diversified landscape with many destinations that are completely different from one another. We have many unique “hidden paradises”, either on the islands, on the mainland or in the mountains, which can create memorable and life-changing experiences to people that visit them.

  • What is your favorite destination in Greece and why?

I would rather refer to my favorite experience. What I really enjoy is cruising with my motorbike. Either on the mainland, with the eye-catching landscape, the rich nature, the forests and the villages; or on the Aegean and Ionian islands. Each island reveals hidden and unique beauties to you.

  • If you could pass on a message to the hospitality industry about Greece, what would it be?

Greece needs to invest more in the combination: knowledge, people and technology. The industry needs to trust more the right talented professionals that have the right knowledge. Additionally, we live in a digital age and the technology provides us with very powerful tools, usable in all aspects of a hospitality business. The industry should always be open and constantly embrace technological innovation and changes.

  • What are your plans for the future?

My plan for the time being is to continue to Grow as a company and to be recognized as a successful and valuable partner in sales and marketing management for small and medium-sized accommodations in Greece and abroad.

  • If you didn’t work in the hospitality industry where would you be?

Since I remember myself, I always wanted to be in the hospitality industry. It was my first and only choice. Therefore it is very hard for me to think what I would do if I was not in the industry.

Connect with Ioakeim Gritsipis on LinkedIn

About the Author

Nikos is Greek-American born in New York, USA, and has lived in Greece for over 30 years. He is the managing editor of Greece’s leading monthly travel and tourism guide, the Greek Travel Pages (GTP) since June 2008 and of news site GTP Headlines since its launch in September 2012. Nikos has also served as international press officer for the City of Athens and for the mayor. He has a degree in Mass Media and Communications, specializing in Journalism. Nikos is a native English speaker and speaks Greek fluently.

Buhalis, D., Harwood, T., Bogicevic, V., Viglia, G., Beldona, S., Hofacker, C., 2019, Technological disruptions in Services: lessons from Tourism and Hospitality, Journal of Service Management,

NEW PAPER:

Buhalis, D., Harwood, T., Bogicevic, V., Viglia, G., Beldona, S., Hofacker, C., 2019, Technological disruptions in Services: lessons from Tourism and Hospitality, Journal of Service Management, Vol. 30 No. 4, pp. 484-506

https://doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-12-2018-0398

Purpose

Technological disruptions such as the Internet of Things and autonomous devices, enhanced analytical capabilities (artificial intelligence) and rich media (virtual and augmented reality) are creating smart environments that are transforming industry structures, processes and practices. The purpose of this paper is to explore critical technological advancements using a value co-creation lens to provide insights into service innovations that impact ecosystems. The paper provides examples from tourism and hospitality industries as an information dependent service management context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research synthesizes prevailing theories of co-creation, service ecosystems, networks and technology disruption with emerging technological developments.

Findings

Findings highlight the need for research into service innovations in the tourism and hospitality sector at both macro-market and micro-firm levels, emanating from the rapid and radical nature of technological advancements. Specifically, the paper identifies three areas of likely future disruption in service experiences that may benefit from immediate attention: extra-sensory experiences, hyper-personalized experiences and beyond-automation experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Tourism and hospitality services prevail under varying levels of infrastructure, organization and cultural constraints. This paper provides an overview of potential disruptions and developments and does not delve into individual destination types and settings. This will require future work that conceptualizes and examines how stakeholders may adapt within specific contexts.

Social implications

Technological disruptions impact all facets of life. A comprehensive picture of developments here provides policymakers with nuanced perspectives to better prepare for impending change.

Originality/value

Guest experiences in tourism and hospitality by definition take place in hostile environments that are outside the safety and familiarity of one’s own surroundings. The emergence of smart environments will redefine how customers navigate their experiences. At a conceptual level, this requires a complete rethink of how stakeholders should leverage technologies, engage and reengineer services to remain competitive. The paper illustrates how technology disrupts industry structures and stimulates value co-creation at the micro and macro-societal level.

NEW ARTICLE Anagnostopoulou, S., Buhalis, D., Kountouri, I., Manousakis, E. and Tsekrekos, A. (2019), “The impact of online reputation on hotel profitability”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management,  https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-03-2019-0247

NEW ARTICLE

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to quantify the impact of online customer reputation on financial profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

Online reputation is captured by extracting the most recurring textual themes associated with customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction, expressed within positive vs negative online guest reviews on Booking.com. Latent semantic analysis is used for textual analysis. Proxies of overall financial performance are manually constructed for the sample hotels, using financial data from the Financial Analysis Made Easy (FAME) database. Ordinary least squares is used to gauge the effect of online customer reputation on financial profitability.

Findings

Empirical findings indicate that recurring textual themes from positive online reviews (in contrast to negative reviews) exhibit a higher degree of homogeneity and consensus. The themes repeated in positive, but not in negative reviews, are found to significantly associate with hotel financial performance. Results contribute to the discussion about the measurable effect of online reputation on financial performance.

Originality/value

Contemporary quantitative methods are used to extract online reputation for a sample of UK hotels and associate this reputation with bottom-line financial profitability. The relationship between online reputation, as manifested within hotel guest reviews, and the financial performance of hotels is examined. Financial profitability is the result of revenues, reduced by the costs incurred in order to be able to offer a given level of service. Previous studies have mainly focused on basic measures of performance, i.e. revenue generation, rather than bottom-line profitability. By combining online guest reviews from travel websites (Booking.com) with financial measures of enterprise performance (FAME), this study makes a meaningful contribution to the strategic management of hotel businesses.

Keywords

New paper published : Yao, B., Qiu, R., Fan, D., Liu, A. and Buhalis, D. (2019), “Standing out from the crowd – an exploration of signal attributes of Airbnb listings”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Vol. 32. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-02-2019-0106

New paper published : Yao, B., Qiu, R., Fan, D., Liu, A. and Buhalis, D. (2019), Standing out from the crowd – an exploration of signal attributes of Airbnb listings“, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Vol. 32. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-02-2019-0106

Airbnb signal attributes and competitiveness

Abstract

Due to product diversity, traditional quality signals in the hotel industry such as star ratings and brand affiliation do not work well in the accommodation booking process on the sharing economy platform. From a suppliers’ perspective, this study aims to apply the signaling theory to the booking of Airbnb listings and explore the influence of quality signals on the odds of an Airbnb listing being booked. A binomial logistic model is used to describe the influences of different attributes on the market demand. Because of the large sample size, sequential Bayesian updating method is utilized in hospitality and tourism field for the first attempt. Results show that, in addition to host-specific information such as “Superhost” and identity verification, attributes including price, extra charges, region competitiveness and house rules are all effective signals in Airbnb. The signaling impact is more effective for the listings without any review comments. This study contributes to the literature by incorporating the signaling theory in the analysis of booking probability of Airbnb accommodation. The research findings are valuable to hosts in improving their booking rates and revenue. In addition, government and industrial management organizations can have more efficient strategy and policy planning.

 

New paper published: Rihova, I., Moital, M., Buhalis, D. and Gouthro, M. (2019), “Practice-based segmentation: taxonomy of Customer to Customer (C2C) co-creation practice segments”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management,  https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-01-2018-0096

New paper published: Rihova, I., Moital, M., Buhalis, D. and Gouthro, M. (2019), “Practice-based segmentation: taxonomy of Customer to Customer (C2C) co-creation practice segments“, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management,  https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCHM-01-2018-0096

Abstract

This paper aims to explore and evaluate practice-based segmentation as an alternative conceptual segmentation perspective that acknowledges the active role of consumers as value co-creators. Data comprising various aspects of customer-to-customer (C2C) co-creation practices of festival visitors were collected across five UK-based festivals, using participant observation and semi-structured interviews with naturally occurring social units (individuals, couples and groups). Data were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis procedure within QSR NVivo 10. Private, sociable, tribal and communing practice segments are identified and profiled, using the interplay of specific subject- and situation-specific practice elements to highlight the “minimum” conditions for each C2C co-creation practice. Unlike traditional segments, practice segment membership is shown to be fluid and overlapping, with fragmented consumers moving across different practice segments throughout their festival experience according to what makes most sense at a given time. Although practice-based segmentation is studied in the relatively limited context of C2C co-creation practices at festivals, the paper illustrates how this approach could be operationalised in the initial qualitative stages of segmentation research. By identifying how the interplay of subject- and situation-specific practice elements affects performance of practices, managers can facilitate relevant practice-based segments, leading to more sustainable business. The paper contributes to segmentation literature by empirically demonstrating the feasibility of practice-based segments and by evaluating the use of practice-based segmentation on a strategic, procedural and operational level. Possible methodological solutions for future research are offered.

C2C

 C2C