Written by

Milla Rasanen (Sweden)

I am Milla Rasanen from Sweden studying a master’s in  Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology. Bournemouth University has a lot of clubs and societies to choose from, but if you can’t find one that appeals to you, you can always start your own society. That’s what my friends and I did. We started the Humanist Society which promotes science, reason and empathy while advocating for the rights of humanist students on campus. Not only am I a member of the society, I am the president.

Learn new skills

As the president, I have a lot of responsibility and duties. I arrange meetings, contact outside organisations and ensure everything runs smoothly. One thing that surprised me about being the president is how many valuable skills I have learned. I have learned skills in organisation, time management, leadership and even design. All these will be extremely useful when I start looking for work after I graduate.

Learn how to plan and multitask

Balancing the duties of a society president with studies, work and a social life is not always easy, but with planning and time management it is possible. I have made a clear schedule which states when I study and when I do things for the society. It has really helped me stay on top of everything. For example, I set aside a specific time of day when I write all the emails regarding the society – that way I don’t have to think about them when I am doing other things because I know I’ll have time to write them later.

Meet people outside your circle

While I have learned a lot, I mainly joined the society for the social aspect. A society is a great way of meeting new people and making new friends. You already have something in common with the other members, which makes it easier to become friends. One of the best things about the new friends I’ve made in the society is that they are all studying completely different subjects than me. I would have never got to know them without the society and it has been such a great experience widening my social circle and getting to know people outside my course.

Joining a society can be very rewarding because you can gain new skills and do something good for your community. However, the number one thing I love about being a member of a society is that it is a lot of fun. I have met great people through the society and often our meetings end with all of us continuing the night at Dylan’s Kitchen and Bar with drinks and a bite to eat.

Milla Rasanen, Sweden, MSc Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology