Louis Sherman Written by

Final year

BSc (Hons) Applied Geography

By Louis Sherman

1st year BU student, BSc (Hons) Applied Geography

You cannot really prepare yourself for halls, it is a really different experiences to whatever you may have had living in just a house with your family. First of all, all the usual rules of living in a house go out of the window. You can be loud, although you can take it too far sometimes, you can sit wherever without your mum nagging at you, you can sleep in the hallway as much as your own bed, pretty much anything goes in halls, to a certain degree. However that is only one tiny aspect of living in halls. The biggest benefit is without doubt the people you meet, I was in Chesil house and it is all about finding the right accommodation for you.

As soon as you walk through that flat door on the first day at university you have 5 or 6 other people to meet and get to know, within hours you are friends with some hilarious and great times ahead. In halls everyone wants to get to know each other, so even if you feel like you don’t fit in as long as you make an effort to get to know the people in your flat you will almost always be accepted and even if you think you are all different at first you are bound to come together and get along really well. It is all about putting yourself out there. But don’t think these are the only people you will meet in halls.

In halls there is literally hundreds, maybe thousands of people to meet. You walk out your flat door and right outside there is another door full of possible friends, the same goes for across the stairs or on the other side of the building There is a truly monumental amount of people you can meet, it really is incredible.  This is the thing with halls, you just have endless people to meet and as such so many different opportunities to take up. Halls is all about making friends and this is what makes it such an amazing time and experience, so make sure to enjoy it!

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