Journal club today at 4 pm in K103

All welcome!

Journal club today at 4 pm in K103
The importance of social bonding and the hormonal pathways that lead to bonds

This very recent study shows how social bonding in non-related male chimpanzee friends is linked to the same system that is involved in the mother-offspring bond.

This has implications for many things related to human evolution and our understanding of how social bonding and cooperation in humans and animals. This is also fitting in nicely with the recent emphasis on cooperative breeding as a very important aspect in human evolution as it has allowed possibly for the increase in brain size.

BBC news story on this paper by Crockford et al (from the EVA Max Planck Institute in Leipzig): http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/21131703

Real article:
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1755/20122765.short

 

Urinary oxytocin and social bonding in related and unrelated wild chimpanzees

Animals that maintain cooperative relationships show gains in longevity and offspring survival. However, little is known about the cognitive or hormonal mechanisms involved in cooperation. Indeed, there is little support for a main hypothesis that non-human animals have the cognitive capacities required for bookkeeping of cooperative exchanges. We tested an alternative hypothesis that cooperative relationships are facilitated by an endocrinological mechanism involving oxytocin, a hormone required for bonding in parental and sexual relationships across mammals. We measured urinary oxytocin after single bouts of grooming in wild chimpanzees. Oxytocin levels were higher after grooming with bond partners compared with non-bond partners or after no grooming, regardless of genetic relatedness or sexual interest. We ruled out other possible confounds, such as grooming duration, grooming direction or sampling regime issues, indicating that changes in oxytocin levels were mediated by social bond strength. Oxytocin, which is thought to act directly on neural reward and social memory systems, is likely to play a key role in keeping track of social interactions with multiple individuals over time. The evolutionary linkage of an ancestral hormonal system with complex social cognition may be the primary mechanism through which long-term cooperative relationships develop between both kin and non-kin in mammals.

 

Research Seminar – The Doomsday Seed Vault: putting genetic diversity on ice for the future

Please note this event is for BU Students and Staff only.

Don’t forget to come along to the latest Research Seminar this afternoon!

The Doomsday Seed Vault: putting genetic diversity on ice for the future
Professor Geoff Hawtin, Global Crop Diversity Trust

Date: Tuesday 22 January 2013
Time: 16:00-17:00hr
Place: CG04 (with refreshments and continued discussion in C126 afterwards)

The School Research Seminars provide important opportunities for academic refreshment and intellectual nourishment! Presentations by newly appointed academic staff and eminent invited speakers will open discussion both within the seminar itself and, less formally, over refreshments afterwards in the School Common Room (C126).

BU here to help over the festive season

Our askBU Enquiry Service is open over the festive period.

We know what a key time it is for you applying to uni and we want to be
here to help so if you have a question call us on 01202 961916.

We’re here from 10:00 – 16:00 (GMT) on:

  • Monday 24 December
  • Thursday 27 December
  • Friday 28 December
  • Monday 31 December

You can find more information at www.bournemouth.ac.uk/askBU

BU expert uncovering truth on UK’s largest archaeological hoax

December marks the 100 year anniversary of the Piltdown Man’s discovery; a key moment in British archaeology history. Bournemouth University senior lecturer in archaeology Dr Miles Russell, has been invited to give his thoughts to the media on arguably the UK’s largest archaeological hoax.

So far, Miles, an expert on the Piltdown discovery, has been invited to speak to give his theory on the hoax and who was behind it, on BBC Radio 4′s Today programme – Making History plus several local BBC stations, including BBC Radio Solent and BBC Radio Sussex.

Speaking to Making History, Miles said, “Most people like conspiracy theories and with Piltdown it is possible to construct multiple theories based on theories at the time.”

On the Today programme, speaking to Evan Davis, Miles said, “It was exactly the sort of find that people wanted for the time. In 1912 the find was saying that the cradle of humanity was the home counties of England.” 

Miles Russell has written a book on the subject, called ‘The Piltdown Man: Case Closed’ where he helps to uncover the mystery of the Piltdown Man and finger the culprit behind the hoax.

Miles spoke at a National Geological Society event on 18 December, 100 years to the day since the first announcement. The event was chaired by Sir David Attenborough and Miles gave his thoughts on the subject.

Miles Russell profile:
http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/applied-sciences/people/staff/mrussell.html

Buy The Piltdown Man Hoax: Case Closed
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B001HPH4JC

Study Archaeology at BU:
http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/applied-sciences/study-with-us/undergraduate.html

Justine Cordingley awarded PhD

The School is pleased to announce that following the successful completion of Justine Cordingley’s PhD viva, the examiners (Dr Felix Eigenbrod (Southampton) and Professor Richard Stillman (BU)) have agreed to the recommendation for the award of PhD, subject to amendments to the thesis titled: Ecosystem Service Provision in Dynamic Heath Landscapes. The viva was chaired by Dr Richard Stafford.

Congratulations Justine!

Research Seminar – Hitching a ride and invading the world!

Please note this event is for BU Students and Staff only.

Don’t forget to come along to the latest Research Seminar.

Hitching a ride and invading the world!
Dr Emilie Hardouin, School of Applied Sciences, Bournemouth University

Date: Tuesday 4 December
Time: 16:00-17:00hr
Place: CG04 (with refreshments and continued discussion in C126 afterwards)

The School Research Seminars provide important opportunities for academic refreshment and intellectual nourishment! Presentations by newly appointed academic staff and eminent invited speakers will open discussion both within the seminar itself and, less formally, over refreshments afterwards in the School Common Room (C126).

BU Archaeologist part of project shortlisted for English Heritage Angel Awards

A long running archaeology project run by the South West Marine Archaeology Group, which includes Bournemouth University academic Dave Parham, was one of the projects nominated for an English Heritage Angel Award.

The project involved the investigation of a 17th century cannon site and a bronze age submerged site – possibly one of the oldest shipwreck sites in the world. The groups work led to the site being removed from the ‘English Heritage; Heritage at Risk’ register in 2009. 

Dave Parham, Senior Lecturer in Marine Archaeology at Bournemouth University and appointed archaeologist for the South West Marine Archaeology Group said, “Whilst the group did not win the award category ‘Best rescue of any other heritage site’ we are proud that our work has been recognised at this level”

Placement & International Fieldwork Fair – An Introduction to Placements

Congratulations to Polly Dimelow who won the Applied Sciences Placement Poster competition with her poster promoting her placement on the ‘Maltese Temple Landscape Project’ run by Professor Tim Darvill and John Gale.

The £100 cash prize was awarded for the poster with the most amounts of student votes at our annual Placement & International Fieldwork Fair- An Introduction to Placements yesterday.
At the Fair, Dr Anita Diaz and Julie Gill (ApSci Placement Co-ordinator) launched a number of placements for our students including opportunities to work with primary and secondary schools with our ‘Aim Higher’ team and overseas Academic-led research projects in Malta, Peru, Germany and the Pyrenees. They also informed students about possible funding streams, the School’s International Travel Grant and BU’s Global Horizons fund.

We also heard from Antony Jinman, ETE (Education through Expeditions) and his experiences of using fieldwork to enhance employability by getting the most out of your placement.

BU Archaeological Society Presentation

Please note this event is for BU Students and Staff only.

Date: Tuesday 13 November
Time: 7pm – 8pm
Location: PG19

The first presentation hosted by the BU Archaeological Society is taking place this evening. Our guest speaker is the internationally renowned archaeologist , Miles Russell, who will be giving a lecture entitled “All Archaeologists are Evil”!.

This is the first of a series of diverse archaeological presentations that are planned over the next 2 terms, to be given by a mix of internal and external guest speakers.

If you would like to come along this evening, you are invited to enrol as a member of the Bournemouth University Archaeology Society. Membership costs £5 for the year; this will entitle you to free entrance at all of the presentations during the year and invitations to attend subsidised trips to important archaeological sites across Wessex that we plan to organise throughout the year. If you don’t want to join the society that’s fine, but we would ask that you donate £1 each time you attend one of our presentations.

You can join the society this evening either before or after the presentation.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Thanks,

Paul Banton
Archaeology (Level I)

 

 

António Fernandes awarded the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The School is pleased to announce that following today’s viva voca for António Fernandes, the examiners (Tim Williams from UCL and Mark Maltby)  have agreed to award António the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) subject to corrections being made to his thesis titled:  Natural processes in the degradation of open-air rock-art sites: an urgency intervention scale to inform conservation.  The viva voca was chaired by Amanda Korstjens.

Congratulations  António!